Tuesday, 4 February 2014

Ruby - Global Variables

I’m guessing you've already deduced what the scope of a Global variable is? Unlike local variables, these are accessible at any and from any point in your script. As such their use is frowned upon as it makes it harder to maintain scripts and control what can be done with data. If you change something about a Global variable, everything referring to it could break. Often the break that’s been observed then gets ‘fixed’ and not the root cause… uh oh, as developers and testers we all know where this scenario can lead.



However, that general warning aside, there are often good reasons for using Global variables, especially in small scripts. If we’re putting a simple automation script together or a game where a hero’s name will remain the same, it could make sense to use a global variable.

Type or copy the following into a new .rb file, call it from a CMD window and see what it does:

# globalVariable_001.rb
# define the Global variable for the hero's name
$globalHeroName = "Zargon"

# define the method getHeroName
def getHeroName
        print "What's the hero called?\n"
        heroNameChoice = gets.chomp
               if heroNameChoice == $globalHeroName
                       puts "Correct, the hero is called #{$globalHeroName}! The Orc hugs you!\n"
        else
                       puts "Oops... that's not the hero's name, the Orc hits you for 10pts of DMG!\n"
                end #the If
end #the Def

# Call the method defined above
getHeroName

#Check if there's a Global Variable called $globalHeroName
puts "Global variables include $globalHeroName? (True or False)  #{global_variables.include? :$globalHeroName}\n"

Here we have a Global variable called $globalHeroName defined in the main body of the script. Then a method called getHeroName is set up. Within it a nested If statement checks if the $globalHeroName matches the one the player entered into heroNameChoice (a local variable). If the variable $globalHeroName wasn’t global, we couldn’t reach it from the Method, let alone the If statement within the Method. Adequate proof the variable $globalHeroName really is Global in scope.

As a final check we added the line puts global_variables.include? :$globalHeroName. This is asking, do global_variables in the script include one called $globalHeroName? The answer to which is true, showing it really is a Global variable.

To test out a few assumptions, try making the following changes:

  • Remove the $ sigil from all instances of $globalHeroName, so there are globalHeroName
The script should now fail as we’ve made the variable a local one, which isn’t available in the Method and If statements.



  • Now move this local variable into the Method, by placing it after the Def statement
The script will work again as the local variable globalHeroName is within the code block where it’s used. However, you’ll notice the check for it being Global now fails as we’d expect, give it’s now local in scope.





That’s the low down on Local and Global variables. Use Global variables with care and do name all your variables in a meaningful way.


Read More:
http://cyreath.blogspot.co.uk/2014/02/ruby-constants.html
http://cyreath.blogspot.co.uk/2014/02/ruby-instance-and-class-variables.html
http://cyreath.blogspot.co.uk/2014/02/ruby-local-variables.html
http://cyreath.blogspot.co.uk/2014/02/ruby-variables-categories-and-scope.html
http://cyreath.blogspot.co.uk/2014/01/ruby-variables-part-1.html
http://cyreath.blogspot.co.uk/2014/01/ruby-getting-and-using-user-input.html
http://cyreath.blogspot.co.uk/2014/01/download-and-install-ruby.html





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